jım croce-bad bad Leroy Brown

Önceki başlık Sonraki başlık Aşağa gitmek

jım croce-bad bad Leroy Brown

Mesaj  Admin Bir Çarş. Nis. 23, 2008 11:42 pm


Admin
Admin

Mesaj Sayısı : 5132
Kayıt tarihi : 27/01/08

Kullanıcı profilini gör http://zeka.onlinegoo.com

Sayfa başına dön Aşağa gitmek

BAD BAD LEROY BROWN -SÖZLER-

Mesaj  Admin Bir Çarş. Nis. 23, 2008 11:44 pm

Well the south side of chicago
Is the baddest part of town
And if you go down there
You better just beware
Of a man named leroy brown

Now leroy more than trouble
You see he stand bout six foot four
All the downtown ladies call him treetop lover
All the mens just call him sir

And its bad, bad leroy brown
The baddest man in the whole damn town
Badder than old king kong
And meaner than a junkyard dog

Now leroy he a gambler
And he like his fancy clothes
And he like to wave his diamond rings
In front of everybodys nose
He got a custom continental
He got an eldorado too
He got a 32 gun in his pocket for fun
He got a razor in his shoe

And its bad, bad leroy brown
The baddest man in the whole damn town
Badder than old king kong
And meaner than a junkyard dog

Well friday bout a week ago
Leroy shootin dice
And at the edge of the bar
Sat a girl named doris
And ooh that girl looked nice
Well he cast his eyes upon her
And the trouble soon began
And leroy brown learned a lesson
bout messin with the wife of a jealous man

And its bad, bad leroy brown
The baddest man in the whole damned town
Badder than old king kong
And meaner than a junkyard dog,

Well the two men took to fightin
And when they pulled them from the floor
Leroy looked like a jigsaw puzzle
With a couple of pieces gone

And its bad, bad leroy brown
The baddest man in the whole damn town
Badder than old king kong
And meaner than a junkyard dog

Admin
Admin

Mesaj Sayısı : 5132
Kayıt tarihi : 27/01/08

Kullanıcı profilini gör http://zeka.onlinegoo.com

Sayfa başına dön Aşağa gitmek

JIM CROCE -YAŞAM ÖYKÜSÜ

Mesaj  Admin Bir Çarş. Nis. 23, 2008 11:53 pm

Jim Croce
Born January 10, 1943(1943-01-10)
Origin Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Died September 20, 1973 (aged 30)
Genre(s) Rock, Folk
Instrument(s) Piano
Guitar
Harmonica
Vocals
Years active 1960–1973
Label(s) Capitol
ABC Dunhill
James Joseph Croce, pronounced (CROW-chee) (January 10, 1943 – September 20, 1973), popularly known as Jim Croce, was an American singer-songwriter.

Croce scored a handful of hit songs in the early '70s, but died in an airplane crash just as he was beginning to capitalize on his success. He is probably best remembered for the song "Bad, Bad Leroy Brown," a #1 hit in 1973.






Biography

Early life
Croce was born in South Philadelphia. He graduated from Upper Darby High School in Drexel Hill, Pennsylvania in 1960. In 1976, he was the first former student to be added to the Upper Darby High School Wall of Fame. While attending Villanova University (1965 graduate), Croce was a member of the Villanova Singers and Villanova Spires; was a student deejay at WXVU[1]; grew to be interested in becoming a professional musician; and met his future wife, Ingrid Jacobson, at a hootenanny at Convention Hall in Philadelphia, where he was a judge for a contest. When they married, he converted to Judaism.[2]


Early career
During the early 1960s, Croce formed a number of college bands, performed at coffee houses and universities, and later performed with his wife as a duo in the mid-1960s to early 1970s. At first, their performances included songs by Ian and Sylvia, Gordon Lightfoot, Joan Baez, and Woody Guthrie, but in time they began writing their own music, such as "Age," "Hey Tomorrow," and "Spin Spin Spin," which later led to Croce's hit songs in the early 1970s.

At the same time, Croce got his first long-term gig at a rural bar and steak house in Lima, Pennsylvania, called the Riddle Paddock. There, over the next few years, Croce developed a very engaging rapport with tough audiences and built his musical repertoire to more than 3,000 songs. His set list included every genre from blues to country to rock 'n roll to folk, with tender love songs and traditional bawdy ballads, always introduced with a story and an impish grin.

In 1968, Jim and Ingrid Croce were encouraged to move to New York City to record their first album with Capitol Records. For the next two years, they drove more than 300,000 miles[citation needed] playing small clubs and concerts on the college concert circuit promoting their album Jim & Ingrid Croce.

Then, disillusioned by the music business and New York City, Croce sold all but one guitar to pay the rent, and they returned to the Pennsylvania countryside where Croce got a job driving trucks and doing construction to pay the bills. He called this his "character development period" and spent a lot of his time sitting in the cab of a truck, composing songs about his buddies and the folks he enjoyed meeting at the local bars and truck stops.


Success
Music sample:
"Time in a Bottle" excerpt


From the album "You Don't Mess Around With Jim"
Problems listening to the file? See media help.In 1970, Croce met classically trained pianist/guitarist, singer-songwriter Maury Muehleisen from Trenton, New Jersey through Joe Salviuolo (aka Sal Joseph). Salviuolo was best friends with Jim when they attended Villanova University together, and Salviuolo later discovered Maury when he was teaching at Glassboro State College in New Jersey. Sal, along with Tommy West and Terry Cashman, brought this duo together in the Cashman and West production office in New York City. Initially, Croce backed Muehleisen on guitar at his gigs. But in time, their musical strengths led them each to new heights. Muehleisen's ethereal and inspired guitar leads became the perfect accompaniment to Croce's down-to-earth music.

In 1972, Croce signed to a three-record deal with ABC Records releasing You Don't Mess Around with Jim and Life & Times in the same year. The singles "You Don't Mess Around with Jim," "Operator (That's Not The Way It Feels)," and "Time In A Bottle" (written for his newborn son, A. J. Croce) helped the former album reach #1 on the charts in 1974. Croce's biggest single, "Bad, Bad Leroy Brown," hit #1 on the U.S. charts in the summer of 1973, selling two million copies.


pale Sudden death
Croce, 30, and Muehleisen, 24, died in a small commercial plane crash on September 20, 1973, one day before his third ABC album, I Got a Name was to be released. The posthumous release included four hits, "I Got A Name," "Workin' At The Car Wash Blues," "I'll Have To Say I Love You In A Song," and the No. 1 single, "Time In a Bottle" (the third posthumous chart-topping song of the Rock Era (following Otis Redding's "(Sittin' On the) Dock of the Bay" and "Me and Bobby McGee" by Janis Joplin).

Croce had just completed a concert in Natchitoches, Louisiana, and was flying to Sherman, Texas. The pilot and all passengers (Croce, Muehleisen, and George Stevens, the comic who was the show's warm up act) were killed instantly at 10:45 PM EST on September 20, 1973, less than an hour after the end of their last concert. Upon takeoff, the plane did not gain enough altitude to clear an area of large pecan trees at the end of the runway. The official report from the NTSB[3] hints that the charter pilot, Robert Newton Elliott, who had severe coronary artery disease and had run a portion of the 3 miles to the airport from a motel, may have suffered a heart attack causing him to crash into the trees on a clear runway with excellent visibility. A later investigation placed sole blame for the accident on pilot error.

Croce was laid to rest in the Philadelphia area, even though he had recently relocated to San Diego. Family, friends, and fans were stunned to learn of the premature death of the two musicians.

News of the premature deaths of the duo sparked a massive interest in Jim’s first two albums – “You Don’t Mess Around With Jim” and “Life and Times” - as well as the “I Got A Name” single, which was released later that same week. This was followed closely by the release of the album of the same title. Sales soared and resulted in three gold records. A “Greatest Hits” package released in 1974 also proved to be extraordinarily popular. The catalogue became a staple of radio play, turntables, cassettes, and CDs for years, and is still receiving significant airplay in the first decade of the 21st century.


Musical legacy
In 1985, Ingrid Croce opened "Croce's Restaurant & Jazz Bar", located in the historic Gaslamp District in San Diego, California, as a tribute to her late husband. In 1990, Croce was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. Since then, they have released Jim Croce Home Recordings, Facets, Jim Croce: Classic Hits, and the first ever DVD of Jim's television performances on "Have You Heard – Jim Croce Live". The most recent release was in January, 2006--. "Have You Heard - Jim Croce Live", the CD. The two also co-produced a PBS special, with archive footage from the Croce family collection, along with excerpts of the DVD Have You Heard – Jim Croce Live.

Croce is paid tribute to in The Righteous Brothers song Rock And Roll Heaven. He is also mentioned in Stephen King's You Know They Got a Hell of a Band, a short story about a town populated by late music legends. The title of King's short story comes from a line in the Righteous Brothers song. Gino Vanelli wrote the song "Poor Happy Jimmy" as a tribute to Croce.

Quotes
His personal motto: "If you dig it, do it. If you really dig it, do it twice."

On his roots: "I never really thought of my neighborhood in South Philly as being a neighborhood, it was more a state of mind. For people who aren't familiar with those kind of places, it's a whole different thing. Like 42nd Street in New York City is a state of mind."
Discography
Facets (1966) (re-released with additional tracks, 2003)
Jim & Ingrid Croce (with Ingrid Croce) (1969)
You Don't Mess Around with Jim (1972)
Life & Times (1973)
I Got a Name (1973)
Photographs & Memories - His Greatest Hits (1974)
Down the Highway (1975)
The Faces I've Been (1975)
Time in a Bottle/Jim Croce's Greatest Love Songs (1976)
Jim Croce Live: The Final Tour (1989)
The 50th Anniversary Collection (1992)
The Definitive Collection: "Time in a Bottle" (1999) (2 CDs)
Home Recordings: Americana (2003)
Classic Hits (2004)
Have You Heard (audio CD) (2006)

Billboard singles
1 - Bad, Bad Leroy Brown (1973)
1 - Time in a Bottle (1973)
8 - You Don't Mess Around With Jim (1972)
9 - I'll Have to Say I Love You in a Song (1974)
10 - I Got a Name (1973)
17 - Operator (That's Not the Way It Feels) (1972)
32 - Workin' At The Car Wash Blues (1974)
37 - One Less Set Of Footsteps (1973)
63 - Chain Gang Medley (1973)
64 - It Doesn't Have To Be That Way (1976)

Admin
Admin

Mesaj Sayısı : 5132
Kayıt tarihi : 27/01/08

Kullanıcı profilini gör http://zeka.onlinegoo.com

Sayfa başına dön Aşağa gitmek

LEROY BROWN KARAKTERİ FİLİM OLUYOR

Mesaj  Admin Bir Çarş. Nis. 23, 2008 11:59 pm

Baddest man "Leroy Brown" reborn on film By Borys Kit
1 hour, 12 minutes ago



LOS ANGELES (Hollywood Reporter) - Thirty-five years ago, "Bad, Bad Leroy Brown" hit No. 1 on the charts. Now, it might be heading to the big screen.

ADVERTISEMENT

Producer Warren Zide has picked up the rights to Jim Croce's classic pop song in the hope of turning it into an action-comedy franchise.

The song told the fictional story of Leroy Brown, "the baddest man in the whole damn town . . . badder than old King Kong . . . and meaner than a junkyard dog." In the song, Brown makes a pass at girl in a bar, then gets beat up for his trouble by her jealous husband.

Croce died in an airplane crash in 1973, just his career was beginning to take shape.

According to Zide, his uncle tried to secure the rights to the song 25 years ago. When he showed Zide documents of the attempt, Zide called the Croce family, striking up a partnership.

"I guess a classic song never fades away," said Zide, one of the producers behind the "American Pie" and "Final Destination" movies.

"We've always wanted to do a movie with one of Jim's character songs," said Croce's widow, Ingrid. "The concept is about a good guy who can do no wrong. We just want him and his memory and his music to live on. Most importantly, it sounds as if it's going to be a lot of fun. And Jim liked to have to have fun

Admin
Admin

Mesaj Sayısı : 5132
Kayıt tarihi : 27/01/08

Kullanıcı profilini gör http://zeka.onlinegoo.com

Sayfa başına dön Aşağa gitmek

Geri: jım croce-bad bad Leroy Brown

Mesaj  Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Sayfa başına dön Aşağa gitmek

Önceki başlık Sonraki başlık Sayfa başına dön


 
Bu forumun müsaadesi var:
Bu forumdaki mesajlara cevap veremezsiniz